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Thread: 6KW class D

  1. #41
    pls power supply sircuit for amplifier 6kw digital mono

  2. #42
    6000*1.414=8484. (8484*4)sqrt=184V. 184/4=46A If you had an ideal (no losses) amp and supply, you could in theory make 6k with a irs2092, but I wouldn’t believe it until I saw it, or build it, as it seems unnecessarily difficult when you could easily build a few 500w modules. The peak current loops on the pcb would require 4oz copper or bus bars or something. No reason not to try though if this is your goal.

  3. #43
    It would need to be two amps btl.

  4. #44
    diysmps Member*
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    46A on a PCB could be at a 150um board. I never remember the convertion from OZ to um so I can not tell that number. But i have a 18 channel dimmer rack running 3 phase 400V 32A on 105um boards, and it is still running and is almost 35 years old now . I would beleive You could run 46A at 105 - 150 um without damage, and even some short spikes at higher current.

  5. #45
    diysmps Senior Member Silvio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malmir View Post
    46A on a PCB could be at a 150um board. I never remember the convertion from OZ to um so I can not tell that number. But i have a 18 channel dimmer rack running 3 phase 400V 32A on 105um boards, and it is still running and is almost 35 years old now . I would beleive You could run 46A at 105 - 150 um without damage, and even some short spikes at higher current.
    I guess I could be a bit late for this reply but I think it all depend on the cross sectional area of the trace being the thickness of the trace itself being of 1Oz copper (35 microns)(3.5 thousand of an inch) or thicker. The width of the trace also depend on the current handling.

    Bringing all this together will get the cross sectional area of the copper needed to handle the required current without un-necessary heat buildup and voltage drop.

    As a rule of thumb for one ounce copper is 1mm wide per amp for surface traces. One can also find a trace calculator which will tell you how wide is to be the trace according to the current handling.

    (1mm = 0.040 inch) (40 Thousand of an inch)

    The link is found here

    http://mustcalculate.com/electronics/pcbtracewidth.php

    Regards Silvio
    Last edited by Silvio; 12-20-2017 at 10:51 PM.

  6. #46
    150um is roughly 4oz copper and should be able to handle 46A rms (65a pk) although there could be considerably higher spikes and at a couple or a few hundred kHz may get a little noisy. I have no actual measured data on this, that’s my 2 cents.

    cheers

  7. #47
    diysmps Senior Member Silvio's Avatar
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    Well one thing I would say it all adds up to how long, wide and thick is a trace to handle the given current through it.

    Cheers

  8. #48
    I think the last pcb calculator I did was at 45 amps, 4oz copper, 7 inch in length (which could be a little long or short depending on the pcb designer) and a max temp rise of 30 celsius.
    The calculator returned a minimum external trace width of 8 mm with a total loss 6.64 watts through a total .0033 ohms. The peak currents will be something higher than this but it seems a good estimate and reasonable.
    10 celsius increase requires an external trace width of 15 mm.

    I'm curious though, is anyone actually working on making a 6kw class d amp? Has this thread moved over to diyaudio, or maybe lost steam?

  9. #49
    diysmps Senior Member Silvio's Avatar
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    Well the old trick of putting some solder on the trace will enhance current handling, at least that is what I have seen. There is also a video on youtube where Dave Jones proved this.

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